Keeping Score, January 17, 2020

Only 500 words written this week.

The impending move (and sale + purchase) has absorbed most of my available head space. Every day there’s been more paperwork to fill out, more historical information I need to sift through, more obstacles to clear.

I’ve been able to work on a new short story, outlining and sketching out dialog, but that’s all. No progress on the novel, no revisions to other short stories…Nothing.

But today I should, finally, knock out the last few forms until closing day. And for closing, all I have to do is show up 🙂

So I’m hoping to do some catch-up writing this weekend, and have a head clear enough to get back on my regular schedule next week.

What about you? How do you manage to keep your writing going in the middle of a stressful event like a move?

Writing Goals for 2020

As we roll into the second week of 2020, I’m taking some time to look at where I am, writing-career-wise, and where I want to be at the end of this year.

2019 in the Rear View

In 2019, I did finally achieve one goal of mine: I got a short story accepted for publication.

Not published, yet, but accepted, at least. And that’s something I couldn’t say before.

I didn’t finish the edits to the current novel, though, like I wanted. My internal deadline slipped from October 31st, to November 31st, to Dec 31st, and still I didn’t make it.

So one win and one miss? Or one win and one delayed victory?

I’m going to work to make it the latter.

To that end, I’m adopting the following three writing goals for this year:

Four Short Stories

Maberry proposed this one at the last Writers Coffeehouse, and I think I’m going to adopt it.

It means one short story every three months, which seems doable. One month to draft, one month to solicit feedback, another to edit it into shape.

To that end, I’ve already started noodling on a new story. It’s an idea I’ve been chewing on for a few months, looking for the right angle. I’ve decided to just go ahead and write it, dammit, because sometimes the best way to know what a story’s about is to write it down.

Finish the Current Novel

And when I say finish, I mean finish. Edited, reviewed by beta readers, edited again, and polished as much as possible.

I want to be realistic, and not pick a date mid-year for finishing, this time. Progress on the book has been slow, so far. I’d rather be finished early, and not have stressed about it, then worry myself about a deadline that’s only in my head.

So I’ll aim to be done by December 1st. I’m again stealing the date from Maberry, whose reasoning is that if you finish by December 1st, you can spend all of December partying (instead of working your way through the holidays). Sounds like a good plan to me 🙂

Post More

Beyond writing fiction, I’d like to post more on this blog and on Twitter. Both to interact more with you, dear readers, and also to work on my essay skills.

Looking ahead a year or two, I’d like to be writing essays at a level I could sell. To get there, I’ll need to practice.

So, more blog posts: movie reviews, book reviews, and the occasional counter-point to articles I come across.

Keeping Score: January 10, 2020

1,774 words written this week. Managed to hit my writing goal most days, and surpass it once or twice.

I’m trying out a new schedule, where I sit down to write for 30 minutes each day, between walking the pups and doing my morning jog. It’s earlier than before, and pre-shower (thinking in the shower being my traditional way of resolving tricky plot problems).

But somehow, doing it before anything else is helping me. Like I can go on my jog and let my mind wander again, instead of trying to force it to think about the novel.

The words come a bit easier too, because I know I’m going to sit for a given block of time, and there’s not going to be any interruptions.

Granted, I’m still using tricks to get things done, like focusing on just one tiny part of the story at a time, or doing scenes piecemeal (first dialog, then blocking and description, then thoughts/reactions). But it seems to be working, for now, at least.

What about you? Have you tried changing when you set aside time to write, to see if different times of the day (or night) make it easier to put words to page?

Four Writing Techniques I Needed in 2019

I read a lot of writing advice. Books, blog posts, twitter feeds, you name it.

I know it won’t all work for me. But how else can I improve my craft, other than trying new things, and seeing how it comes out?

So here’s four techniques I tried out last year (or carried over from 2018) that have stuck with me, and that I’ll be using a lot in 2020.

One-Inch Picture Frame

Source: Anne Lamott

My current go-to technique. When I’m sitting at the keyboard and the words won’t come, and I think this is it, my imagination’s run dry and I’ll never finish another story, I reach for this.

The idea is simple, and powerful in the way few simple ideas are: Instead of worrying about writing the chapter, or writing the scene, I focus on writing only one little piece of the scene. Just describe how she feels after getting caught in a lie. Describe how he looks at his old room differently, now that he’s been away from home for ten years.

Drill down into something very specific, and write just that. Nothing more.

The narrowed focus lets me relax a little. Because I can’t write a chapter anymore, oh no, and I can’t write a scene, that’s for sure, but I can write how it feels to see someone you love after thinking they were dead. I can do that

And once that’s done, once I’ve really described everything in my one-inch picture frame properly, I look up and I’ve already hit my daily word count goal.

Tracking Word Count Score

Source: Scott Sigler

This one’s a carry-over. Sigler first laid out his points system for tracking word counts at a Writers Coffeehouse in 2018. I tried it out then, and it got me back on track to finish the first draft of my current novel.

Since then, I’ve kept using it: 1 point for each first draft word, 1/2 point for each word gone over in the first editing pass, 1/3 for the third, etc.

It’s helped me feel productive in cases where I wouldn’t, like revising a short story I finished months ago, to get it to the point where I can submit it to magazines. And it’s pushed me to keep writing until I hit that daily word count, and relax when I do so, because I know by hitting it, I’m working steadily towards my larger goals.

Showing Emotion and Thoughts Instead of Telling

Source: Chuck Palahniuk

I was really skeptical of this one. He wrote it up in a post for LitReactor, and it’s couched in language that’s self-confident to the point of being arrogant.

But he’s right. Switching from using language like “she was nervous” to “She looked away, and bit her lip. The fingers of her right hand started drumming a quick beat on her thigh, tap-tap-tap,” is a huge improvement. It’s pushed me to think more about how each of my characters expresses themselves in unique ways, and given me the tools to show that uniqueness to the reader.

Scatter and Fill

Source: V.E. Schwab

Schwab’s twitter feed is a fantastic one to follow for writing advice. She’s very honest about the struggles she faces, and how much guilt she feels over being such a slow writer.

But the brilliant results (in her books) speak for themselves!

In one of her posts, she talked about how when writing a novel, she doesn’t write it in any sort of order. She’ll fill in some dialog in one scene, then a set description in another, and then action in a third. She gradually fills in the work, like painting a canvas, where every brush stroke counts and adds up to the final product.

I’ve always felt compelled to write in strict order, start to finish. So reading this technique works for her was very liberating for me. I still usually write in order, but now if I’m finding it hard to get motivated, I’ll skip around. Write down some dialog that comes to me, or an action or two. Sometimes I can hit my daily word goal this way, and sometimes it just primes the pump so I can fill in the rest. Either way, it gets me around my mental block, and lets me make progress.

Keeping Score: January 3, 2020

Happy New Year! I hope you achieved your writing goals in 2019, and work your way to new heights of craft in 2020.

For myself, I feel like there were several highs: getting my first short story accepted for publication, attending my first writers conference, and discovering the score-keeping method I’ve been using to push my writing forward.

But also several lows. In fact, 2019 ended on a low for me, with me dreading each writing session, and my 300-word daily goal frequently out of reach. Writing has felt more like drawing blood, recently, than making art or even normal work. I’ve not been blocked, so much as completely demotivated.

I’m trying to push through, though. Forcing myself to write the 300 words, each day. Even when they feel pointless, when it seems I’ll never finish this novel. I fear I’ll still be working on it next year, grinding away at something that I might not be able to sell, in the end.

Not a heartening way to start the year, maybe. But I wrote 2,148 words this week, step by step. I’m using Anne Lamott’s one-inch-frame technique, to narrow my focus down to the point where I can write something. It’s working, so far. I am, slowly, making progress.

What about you? What are your writing goals for 2020? And when your inspiration is running low, what do you do to fill it back up?

Keeping Score: December 6, 2019

Only a measly 300 words written this week.

I can blame the time change (from East Coast back to West Coast hours). I can blame the stress of getting back into the day job after a week off.

But really, it’s just been hard pushing the words out this week.

Hard even to carve out time in the day to do it. I know, I know, that’s a perennial excuse, but it’s true: some days, it’s damn hard to find even thirty minutes where my brain isn’t mush and I’m not rushing off to do something else.

So I’m hoping to find some time today, and each day this weekend, so I can at least finish out the week with 1,500 words done.

I feel like I’m going to have to reconsider my schedule soon, though, and drop something from it to make room for writing. Only, I don’t what I could possibly let go of.

How about you? What do you do, when you feel your writing time slipping away? How do you claw it back?

Keeping Score: November 29, 2019

Happy Thanksgiving!

We’re on the East Coast this year, doing what’s become a bit of a tradition for us: Crashing someone else’s Thanksgiving 🙂

We stay with friends of ours in Maryland that we’ve known for the better part of two decades, and spend the week hanging out with them. I usually make a detour up to Boston to see some other good friends of mine, but I make sure I’m back time for turkey.

Thankfully, travel this time doesn’t mean a loss of writing time. Though I’ve fallen off the wagon a bit these past few weeks, this week, at least, I’ve managed to keep up. So: 2,112 words written towards the new novel.

…which is a little less than I’d like, given how much time I’ve spent on trains these past few days, with nothing else to do but type. But I’m finding this last third of the book tricky to navigate. I’m having to pause more and think things through, making notes on different possibilities before picking one and writing it out.

It’s not a bad thing, per se, but it does mean progress feels slow. I’m telling myself that I’ll make up for it later, when I’m able to drop in whole chapters from the first draft, instead of rewriting them from scratch.

If you did NaNoWriMo this month, I hope you’re close to the finish line. If you didn’t, I hope your current work-in-progress is going well.

For everyone, I hope you’re going into the final month of 2019 doing the one thing that is necessary for progress in this craft: writing!

Keeping Score: November 1, 2019

3,026 words written this week.

Most of those are on the novel, but about a third are edits on the short story I wrote back at the SoCal Writers Conference in September.

Reading the story now, I think I like it more than I did before. Not necessarily the language the story’s told in; I can see plot holes and awkward phrasing. But the story itself: The characters and the setting, how the protagonist’s heart gets broken, and how she pieces herself back together. That’s what I’m in love with.

A good sign, maybe? Certainly it motivates me to finish, to edit and polish the story until it’s the best version I can produce.

But it also means I might miss flaws in the telling. I have to beware of liking my own voice too much, instead of the voices of the characters.

How do you balance being critical of the work versus liking it enough to keep going? Do you tend to err on the side of hatred, or do you fall too much in love with your work?

Keeping Score: October 25, 2019

I think I’ve written myself into a corner this week.

I’m working on a scene where I want to have one character drop a particularly important piece of information. It’s something that changes the dynamic of the scene — from fight to negotiation — and sets the stage for a partnership that runs through the rest of the novel.

The trouble is, I’ve gone out of my way earlier in the book to insist she doesn’t remember anything related to this dramatic, juicy, bit of info.

So I’m in a bit of a bind. Do I try to find some awkward way to shoehorn in why she might remember this bit but not anything else?

Or should I go back and rewrite the parts where she doesn’t remember, and change it so that she does? And deal with the ripple effects that’ll cause?

I’m hoping my subconscious is working on the problem, and will present me with a solution soon. I really don’t want to have to rewrite those other scenes, here when I’m so close to finishing this draft.

What do you do, when you realize the needs of the story — the drama, or the tension — are pushing you to change parts of the plot?

Keeping Score: October 18, 2019

2,477 words written this week.

I’m going full-steam-ahead on the novel, closing in on the last dozen scenes or so I need to write to finish it out.

Each new scene, I still think to myself “I don’t know if I can do this.” But if I just sit there long enough, staring at the screen, and refuse to budge, or to look away, the words will come.

They may not be the right words, or good ones. But they’re progress, the raw material I can use later to shape the story.

Pushing ahead on the novel means I’m not going back and revising the short stories I wrote over the Writers Conference weekend. That bothers me, but I’m honestly not sure how to do both. Perhaps once I finish this novel draft, I can pause and revise the short stories before plunging back into the book for another editing pass?

What about you? How do you balance multiple projects? Or, like me, do you find it hard to switch between different works?