Notes from WorldCon 2016: Day Two

Enjoying urban fantasy

  • diana rowland: white trash zombie
  • melissa f olson: tor.com novellas
  • what do you like about uf?
    • city as character
    • looking at things just a little differently
    • what if your gross terrible neighbor was a real monster?
    • a way to crack open the puzzle of the weird world we’re in and understand it better
    • it’s a way to be sneaky: can talk about deep things in a fun way, with people that don’t notice
    • perception: history has been edited down from multiple conflicting perspectives; urban fantasy lets you deal with these different perspectives for more immediate events
    • no real bad guy: bad guy is someone pursuing their goals in a fanatical sense, still think they’re the good guys
    • people are always writing urban fantasy from their primary experience; in feudal days it was fears from lord of the manor, today it’s shopping malls and steelworks (instead of fairy rings)
    • changeling stories are ufo kidnapping stories, just told in a different time
    • uf is the intersection of contemporary fiction and fantasy fiction
    • danger: to cover over real experience with a fantasy gloss; example: the magical homeless people of the 80s)
    • can use unreliable narrators to try to avoid the problems with covering over messy experience
  • why first person?
    • immediacy
    • tight perspective
    • noir influence: almost all first person, huge influence on urban fantasy and its style
  • adrian mcinty: leicht’s favorite irish noir writer
  • rowland: j d robb’s books

Finance for writers

  • put 40% away for federal govt, 10% for state, pay quarterly income taxes estimate, will usually get something back at the end of the year
  • most first books don’t make back their $5,000 advance
  • don’t quit your day job, even after signing tge first contract
  • some contracts don’t last past 2 or 3 books
  • not a steady income
  • be careful with your money; lots of authors aren’t good with their money
  • get good agent: writers tend to not read contracts, approach it very emotionally; good agent will catch things and get you the best deal possible
  • okay to lose money on your craft at first, but have a budget and be aware of it
  • spend money on your craft (take classes, do workshops) and your network (attending cons, etc)
  • but: if you’re at cons, write down what you want to accomplish before you go
  • if you self-publish, spend money on quality: an editor and a cover designer; everything else you can half-ass, but not those
  • keep all receipts for your craft in a shoebox, use them (plus your spreadsheet) to fill out your schedule c for your taxes
  • if you don’t make a profit every seven years, the irs considers it a hobby, not a business
  • average income for writers is $5,000
  • don’t quit your day job until you have 2 years’ worth of living expenses saved up
  • rule one: write, finish, send it out
  • one benefit of incorporating is the ability to defer income from one year to the next (should you score the $70,000 advance)
  • 78% success rate for publishing projects on kickstarter if they get 25 backers; difference between people that are prepared and know what they’re doing and those who don’t
  • bud: turns profit every 5 years; how? Doesn’t report all his expenses that year
  • lots of ways to use kickstarter: events, book tours, playgrounds inspired by literature, self-pubbing books, magazines; can get really creative
  • margot: think of marketing as sharing these stories you’re passionate about with others and inviting them in, not “selling yourself”

Idiot’s Guide to Publishing

  • all scifi community on genie network at the time
  • doctorow hadn’t written a novel yet, so got karl involved
  • patrick: liked it because it was very practical
  • rejectomancy: shouldn’t read too much into rejections; form rejection could be from someone that loved it but didn’t have time, personal could be from someone that doesn’t like the story but likes you personally
  • schroeder: never sold any short stories to the magazines, has only ever sold stories to anthologies
  • at the time, discussion over ebooks concerned fact that they never go out of print, so publishers argue that they don’t have to revert the rights to the author
  • would not try to write today, because has no idea how to get into the field now

Nifty Narrative Tricks

  • bear: what character is like matters less than how you handle the character
  • kowal: people want the familiar in the strange; familiar makes you feel smart, the strange is compelling; when have character engaged in activity or emotion that readers find familiar, then when i engage them in something weird they already have a hook
  • kelly: characterize people by what they own. before walking them on stage, go into their room, or their car: what’s there? is it messy? neat? what’s hanging on the walls? bonus: gives you things to use later in the plot
  • walton: writers get some things for free, and some things they have to learn; easy to teach the things you learned, but almost impossible to teach the things you got for free; she got interesting characters for free, so…story is contract with reader, try to get what story is right up front so reader doesn’t feel betrayed
  • bear: beginning writers make mistake of writing passive characters
  • bear: give the character something to love; instantly makes them more engaging
  • gould: best way to intro tech is to show it when it breaks down; very engaging to intro character when frustrated
  • kowal: frustration will show what character wants, what they love, and give you a measure of their competence
  • kowal: figure out what character wants, and smartest way for them to get it, and then you block off that way (and keep blocking off ways)
  • walton: __ starts with character really having to go to the bathroom while giving speech on history; is pure exposition but you don’t care because you sympathize with having to use the restroom
  • walton: farmer in the sky (heinlein) has similar trick, with tons of worldbuilding done in describing a father and son making dinner
  • term: incluing
  • kelly: how can you tell beginning from middle from end? beginning -> middle: character goes through one way door, and can’t get back to the start; middle -> end: character goes through another one-way door, and story has to end one way or another
  • kowal: stakes are something particular to the character; we’re all going to die, so death is not great stakes; “you’re going to lose your right foot” is more personal
  • kowal: focus indicates thought; what you’re looking at is what you’re thinking about; rhythm and breath: same action at different speed gives you different emotion; how long you linger on something shows how important it is to the character
  • walton: pacing very different between genres; same story told at different pacing can change the genre of the book
  • kelly: look at the story; if you see a section of solid text or solid dialog, that’s probably a pacing problem
  • common mistakes?
    • bear: starting with bloodbath, before you care about the characters
    • kelly: end of story is not the climax, you need a moment for the character to come to grips with what the climax means for them
    • gould: leave some things for the reader to figure out from context
    • kowal: starting with way too much backstory; solve by getting deeper into point of view
    • walton: too fuzzy, character not in focus; can fix by switching to first person, forces you to focus on personal experience
  • walton: often rushes endings, has to go back in and fix pacing after draft finished
  • kowal: best trick: dumping exposition into a sex scene
  • kelly: world-building will happen almost without trying; less you can do of it, the better

Evolution of Epic Fantasy

  • tessa grafton: the united states of asgard
  • sarah beth durst: queen of blood
  • epic fantasy: need close in shots, and medium shots, and landscape shots, all mixed in
  • leicht: research into irish time of troubles taught her everything involved in world-building: how economics is tied to politics is tied to religion is tied to class is tied to language
  • kate elliott: crown of stars
  • leicht: viking skeletons found in bogs: no one checked if they were male or female; many of them (warriors) are female
  • elliott: archeologists finding statues mostly female, labeled one male statue as priest-king and all female as just “fertility”, then were mystified as to why they kept finding female statues